Historical Archive
1969–1970
1969–1970
Lyman
The Axon
Land Use
Vietnam Moratorium
Off ROTC
Cambodia Strike
Trustee Reform (1968–1970)

1969–1970: Richard W.Lyman

May 29, 1968
Open Forum
Unsigned notes taken at an open forum held at Tresidder Memorial Union, May 29, 1968, where Lyman responded to questions.
September 25, 1969
Campus Turmoil
“For moderate students, the charm of all-out confrontation will diminish over time,” Provost Lyman predicted at an annual conference of alumni. Stanford University Press Release, September 25, 1969.
April 16, 1970
Remarks to Law School Board
Prepared remarks to Law School Board of Visitors, Stanford University, presented at Rickey’s Hyatt House, Palo Alto, April 16, 1970 by Richard Lyman, Vice President and Provost.
April 16, 1970
Remarks to Law School Board—Press Release
“Today’s radicals who believe destruction is the only way to save the world are ignoring history …” according to Lyman “an historian himself.” Stanford University Press Release, April 16, 1970.
June 26, 1970
Acting President
“Provost Richard W. Lyman will become acting president of Stanford University on a full time basis, effective Sept. 1 …” Stanford University Press Release, June 26, 1970
July 4, 1970
“Lyman’s major goal: Peace at Stanford”
Stanford’s new acting President promises to strengthen the university’s peace-keeping machinery when he returns from a month’s vacation. Palo Alto Times, July 4, 1970.
August 12, 1970
University Independence
“Universities will survive only if their leaders keep them independent of politics …” according to Lyman. Stanford University Press Release, August 12, 1970.
August 16, 1970
“A Firm Hand For Troubled Stanford”
September 24, 1970
Seventh President
“Richard W. Lyman, a 46 year old historian, today was named Stanford’s seventh president.” Background and biographical information included. Stanford University Press Release, September 24, 1970
September 25, 1969
Violence
Lyman sharply criticized “academic apologists for violence” in his first major speech since becoming president of Stanford. Stanford University Press Release, September 25, 1970.
September 25, 1970
Police Power
Lyman “drew a sharp distinction between police efforts to deal with outright criminal activity on campus and investigations with overtones of thought control.” Report of Lyman’s first news conference as President of Stanford. Stanford University Press Release, September 25, 1970.
September 30, 1970
Time Notes
Notes taken by Bob Beyers on Lyman interview with Barry Hillenbren of Time Magazine, September 30, 1970.
October 1, 1970
Lyman on KZSU
Bob Beyers’s selective transcription of an October 1, 1970 radio interview with Lyman.
October 5, 1970
New Left, Old Right
“Attacks from the New Left, Old Right, and all those who believe politics is ‘dirty’ may be ‘very seriously affecting’ America’s potential for constructive and lasting political change” according to Lyman. Stanford University Press Release, October 5, 1970.
October 9, 1970
Internal and External Threats to Universities
“Universities are ‘at last aroused’ to both internal and external threats to their existence” according to Lyman. Stanford University Press Release, October 9, 1970.
December 14, 1970
Pointlessness of Destroying the University
“Growing numbers of faculty and students, uneasy and unhappy with world conditions, ‘are nevertheless coming to see the pointlessness of destroying the university in order to save it,’” according to Lyman. Stanford University Press Release, December 14, 1970.
January 22, 1971
“Revolt Against Reason”h
“The ‘revolt against reason’ can have ‘infinitely more ominous’ consequences now than ever before in man’s history …,” according to Lyman. Stanford University Press Release, January 22, 1971.
February 19, 1971
“Democracy: Casualty of War”
“If the war in Southeast Asia could be ended by the anguished cries of university presidents it would no doubt have been over long ago.…” Lyman’s Letter to the Editor, New York Times, written February 11, 1971; printed February 19, 1971.
February 19, 1971
War Threatens Democracy
“The prolonged duration of the Vietnam War threatens democracy in a deadly fashion,” according to Lyman. Stanford University Press Release, February 19, 1971, based on Lyman’s letter to the New York Times.
February 22, 1971
Withdrawal
Speaking as a private citizen, Lyman said, “only by setting ourselves a definite target date for total withdrawal from Southeast Asia—B-52s as well as infantrymen—can we extradite ourselves from this tragedy.” Stanford University Press Release, February 22, 1971.
April 26, 1971
Terrorism
“Terrorism tends to be the tactic taken by a protest movement that does not have a mass following,” according to Lyman. Stanford University Press Release, April 26, 1971.
November–December, 1976
Interchange with Siegel
Letters (November 11, 1976 and December 24, 1976) to Lenny Siegel in response to his Grapevine (November and December, 1976) articles.