Historical Archive
1970–1971
1970–1971
The Axon
Career Center
Columbae/Non-Violence
Faculty Politcal Action
Land Use
Repression
ROTC
Stanford Research Institute
Lodge Protest
Laos Invasion
Hospital Issues

1970–1971: Repression

September 21, 1970
Stanford Fears, Girds for Expected Violence
Los Angeles Times article on the “extraordinary precautions” Stanford is taking to deal with the threat of campus violence.
c. December, 1970
What to Think About Over Christmas
Commentary on Lyman’s efforts to affect the judicial process at Stanford.
Some Possible Changes in the Judicial System
Undated, unsigned, suggested changes in Stanford’s judicial system.
The “Subversion” of the Judicial System
Undated, unsigned, three page document about the “subversion” of the judicial system. Which begins, “It has become increasingly evident that the ‘Judicial’ mechanisms at Stanford University are not the fair and impartial system that they originally promised to be.”
January 29, 1971
Stanford Press Release
“An overflow crowd, including many nonstudents, pushed their way past campus police at Stanford Thursday night, Jan. 28, forcing adjournment of a campus judicial hearing for eight students charged with disrupting Henry Cabot Lodge’s Jan. 11 talk.”
January 29, 1971
Stanford Press Release
“Associate Professor of English W. [sic] Bruce Franklin and four students were found in contempt of the Stanford Judicial Council Friday, Jan. 29, during a tumultuous hearing into the disruption of the Henry Cabot Lodge speech on the campus Jan. 11.”
February 1, 1971
Stanford Press Release
Lyman “suspended four students and said he was ‘determining the appropriate action’ in the case of Professor H. Bruce Franklin.”
February 3, 1971
Stanford Press Release
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“Protest against the Laotian invasion began building at Stanford Wednesday, Feb 3, blending with criticism of campus judicial actions …”
February 12, 1971
Stanford Press Release
“The job of ending the Vietnam war is ‘tough enough without…ego trips masquerading as revolution,’ President Richard W. Lyman of Stanford said Thursday night…”
February 26, 1971
Stanford Press Release
Lyman “announced the suspension of six students for disrupting” the speech by Ambassador Lodge.